A more skilled population ahead: age or cohort effects?

By Guillermo Montt. In 2012, the OECD released the first results of the Survey of Adults Skills. Workers in Japan and Finland showed higher proficiency than workers in Spain or Italy. Those findings captured the media attention, as OECD country rankings typically do. But there is much more in the data. The survey assessed the … More A more skilled population ahead: age or cohort effects?

Tax incentives and skills: A cautionary tale about the risk of complexity

By Stijn Broecke. “The hardest thing in the world to understand is the income tax.” –Albert Einstein. Tax incentives are used widely across OECD countries to incentivise individuals to invest in post-compulsory education and training – however little is known about their effectiveness. Recent evidence from the United States highlights the risk of creating overly … More Tax incentives and skills: A cautionary tale about the risk of complexity

Are we only apparently mismatched? Reasons and consequences of apparent qualification mismatch

By Fabio Manca. Measuring skills can be problematic as adequate proxies are, in many cases, not readily available. ‘Qualification levels’ are among the most commonly used proxies for skills as they can be found in large datasets produced by national statistical offices and updated regularly. Qualifications, however, are only an imperfect approximation of workers’ competences, … More Are we only apparently mismatched? Reasons and consequences of apparent qualification mismatch

Automation and Task-based change in OECD countries

By Glenda Quintini and Guillermo Montt. A range of OECD analysis (see the recent OECD Policy Brief on The Future of Work) has been exploring the relationship between digitalisation, jobs and skills, the magnitude of potential job substitution due to technological change, the relationship between globalisation and wage polarisation, as well as the changes to … More Automation and Task-based change in OECD countries

The growing need for developing (the right) STEM skills

By Marieke Vandeweyer. The past decades have seen important shifts in the skills required by the labour market as a consequence of important structural changes such as the rapid improvement in computer technology. As pointed out in previous blog posts, these changes have led to a decrease in the share of employment in routine-intensive occupations, … More The growing need for developing (the right) STEM skills

Going going gone? Routine jobs in Global Value Chains

By Luca Marcolin. Innovation and new technologies – especially Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) – and globalisation are key features of 21st century economies. They contribute to shape firm and industry performance and dynamics, and may trigger radical changes in employment patterns and the skills profile of the workforce. Many factors determine the way firms … More Going going gone? Routine jobs in Global Value Chains

More on digitalisation and skills: What happens within occupations?

By Guillermo Montt. Much attention has been given to the extent to which technology will replace workers. Some alarming estimates point to a large share of jobs at risk of being automated. By focusing only on the unlikely scenario of massive job substitution, the discussion on technological change, jobs and skills has ignored the more … More More on digitalisation and skills: What happens within occupations?